A pet bird at the house of Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, who is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     
 Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, poses for a portrait in her home. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     
 A book on the children that died in the Bosnian War that Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, worked on with her mother, who fought to rescue children during the war. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     
 Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, meets up with her friend Dalibor Perkovic for coffee. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     
 Scenes around Sarajevo on the weekend.
       
     
 Nizama Koldžo, a Bosnian Muslim, poses for a portrait in her home. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.
       
     
 Nizama Koldžo (left), a Bosnian Muslim, gets coffee before heading to a French class she is taking at the French Institute. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister, Nermana (right), recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.
       
     
 In Bosnia-Herzegovina, shadows of doubt and malaise hang over life. The three ethnic groups with “constituent status” as defined by the Dayton Agreement that ended the war in 1995 — Bosnian Muslim (Bosniak), Croat, and Serb — have conflicting views on a large number of issues and problems that shape today’s society. One thing they all agree on, however, is that youth unemployment, at 57.5 percent, the highest in the world, is so severe here that it will be felt for years to come. Through it all, the wounds of war are ever-present. Produced as part of Generation TBD, a GroundTruth series on youth unemployment worldwide. Pictured: young girls walk in Sarajevo at sunset.
       
     
 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, poses for a portrait in Banja Luka, in the Republic Srpska. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     
P_GENTBD_11.jpg
       
     
 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at a salon while she gets ready to go to her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     
 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at to take photos before her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     
 Youths take photos and walk through Banja Luka before a high school prom. After graduating from high school, Bosnian youths are faced with a 60% unemployment rate, and many of whom linger for years after graduating, unable to find employment.
       
     
 Marko Subasic, a Bosnian Croat, poses for a portrait in his apartment in Mostar, Bosnia. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     
 Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, gets a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (center) at the bar Hemingway. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     
 Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, is getting a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (right) at Hemingway Bar. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     
 Youth gather to watch the sunset in Sarajevo.
       
     
 Sarajevo at sunset.
       
     
 A pet bird at the house of Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, who is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     

A pet bird at the house of Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, who is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.

 Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, poses for a portrait in her home. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     

Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, poses for a portrait in her home. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.

 A book on the children that died in the Bosnian War that Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, worked on with her mother, who fought to rescue children during the war. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     

A book on the children that died in the Bosnian War that Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, worked on with her mother, who fought to rescue children during the war. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.

 Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, meets up with her friend Dalibor Perkovic for coffee. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.
       
     

Renata Mostarac, a Bosnian of mixed descent, meets up with her friend Dalibor Perkovic for coffee. Renata is 23-years old and has been unemployed since finishing her Masters degree in the political science branch of public relations at the University of Sarajevo in December, despite applying for numerous jobs. She lives with her mother and father in central Sarajevo, in the same house that they lived in throughout most of the war.

 Scenes around Sarajevo on the weekend.
       
     

Scenes around Sarajevo on the weekend.

 Nizama Koldžo, a Bosnian Muslim, poses for a portrait in her home. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.
       
     

Nizama Koldžo, a Bosnian Muslim, poses for a portrait in her home. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.

 Nizama Koldžo (left), a Bosnian Muslim, gets coffee before heading to a French class she is taking at the French Institute. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister, Nermana (right), recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.
       
     

Nizama Koldžo (left), a Bosnian Muslim, gets coffee before heading to a French class she is taking at the French Institute. She has been unable to find work since finishing her masters degree at a university in Brussels, despite being the first Bosnian to be accepted to that university for their masters. Her twin sister, Nermana (right), recently found employment, so Nizama is left continuing to search while her twin sister, from whom she says she is inseperatable, goes into work.

 In Bosnia-Herzegovina, shadows of doubt and malaise hang over life. The three ethnic groups with “constituent status” as defined by the Dayton Agreement that ended the war in 1995 — Bosnian Muslim (Bosniak), Croat, and Serb — have conflicting views on a large number of issues and problems that shape today’s society. One thing they all agree on, however, is that youth unemployment, at 57.5 percent, the highest in the world, is so severe here that it will be felt for years to come. Through it all, the wounds of war are ever-present. Produced as part of Generation TBD, a GroundTruth series on youth unemployment worldwide. Pictured: young girls walk in Sarajevo at sunset.
       
     

In Bosnia-Herzegovina, shadows of doubt and malaise hang over life. The three ethnic groups with “constituent status” as defined by the Dayton Agreement that ended the war in 1995 — Bosnian Muslim (Bosniak), Croat, and Serb — have conflicting views on a large number of issues and problems that shape today’s society. One thing they all agree on, however, is that youth unemployment, at 57.5 percent, the highest in the world, is so severe here that it will be felt for years to come. Through it all, the wounds of war are ever-present. Produced as part of Generation TBD, a GroundTruth series on youth unemployment worldwide. Pictured: young girls walk in Sarajevo at sunset.

 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, poses for a portrait in Banja Luka, in the Republic Srpska. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     

Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, poses for a portrait in Banja Luka, in the Republic Srpska. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.

P_GENTBD_11.jpg
       
     
 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at a salon while she gets ready to go to her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     

Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at a salon while she gets ready to go to her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.

 Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at to take photos before her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.
       
     

Nikolina Janković, a Bosnian Serb, meets up with her friend at to take photos before her high school prom. Nikolina never went to university and has been unable to find a job since finishing high school three years ago, and has been instead working a string of volunteer positions and internships in the hope of turning them into real employment.

 Youths take photos and walk through Banja Luka before a high school prom. After graduating from high school, Bosnian youths are faced with a 60% unemployment rate, and many of whom linger for years after graduating, unable to find employment.
       
     

Youths take photos and walk through Banja Luka before a high school prom. After graduating from high school, Bosnian youths are faced with a 60% unemployment rate, and many of whom linger for years after graduating, unable to find employment.

 Marko Subasic, a Bosnian Croat, poses for a portrait in his apartment in Mostar, Bosnia. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     

Marko Subasic, a Bosnian Croat, poses for a portrait in his apartment in Mostar, Bosnia. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.

 Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, gets a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (center) at the bar Hemingway. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     

Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, gets a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (center) at the bar Hemingway. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.

 Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, is getting a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (right) at Hemingway Bar. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.
       
     

Marko Subasic (left), a Bosnian Croat, is getting a drink with his roommate, Ilija Knezevic (right) at Hemingway Bar. Marko, after searching for  a job in Bosnia after finishing his bachelor's degree, went back to school because he couldn't find employment. So now that he's about to finish his master's degree, he has decided to move abroad on a scholarship to work.

 Youth gather to watch the sunset in Sarajevo.
       
     

Youth gather to watch the sunset in Sarajevo.

 Sarajevo at sunset.
       
     

Sarajevo at sunset.